CanU10 and the City of London, Ontario in Montréal

From October 18-20, Montréal hosted the 10th annual Council for Canadian Urbanism conference. For this year’s theme, “Fixing the City, Challenges and Learnings,” Copenhagenize’s own Michael Seth Wexler, head of our Montreal office, spoke on a panel about public, active, and shared transportation. With increased mobility via public and non-motorized transportation connections on the agenda of the new Montréal administration, discussions of the benefits of the bicycle in Montréal are more relevant than ever, with real potential to spur change in the city and set an example across the country.

 
 Michael presents on the potential of the bicycle to transform our cities at CanU10. (Council for Canadian Urbanism)

Michael presents on the potential of the bicycle to transform our cities at CanU10. (Council for Canadian Urbanism)

 

With so many visitors in town for the conference, our Montréal office took the opportunity to give a bicycle tour to urban planners and city officials from London, Ontario. While Montréal is no Copenhagen, it is — for now — still the leading bicycle city in North America. In the Plateau borough, the modal share of the bicycle is over 10%, and the borough of Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie has followed in Copenhagen’s footsteps, implementing bicycle footrests at intersections. Taking the London officials on a tour through a number of Montréal’s neighbourhoods, we discussed existing and potential bicycle infrastructure — the good, the bad and the strange.

Although Copenhagenize Design Co. is most known for its tours and inspiration in Copenhagen, we seek out bicycle innovation from all over the world, and understand that there is just as much to learn from developing bicycle cities. From contraflow painted lanes, to protected bidirectional tracks, to off-street greenways, Montréal can teach us a lot about what works — and where there is room for improvement.

 
 Biking along le réseau vert, an off-street greenway alongside railroad tracks in Montréal.

Biking along le réseau vert, an off-street greenway alongside railroad tracks in Montréal.