Measuring happiness via the bicycle at the Canadian Centre for Architecture

 
Copenhagen, commonly known as a bike paradise, is featured in the Canadian Centre for Architecture’s exhibit,  Our Happy Life .

Copenhagen, commonly known as a bike paradise, is featured in the Canadian Centre for Architecture’s exhibit, Our Happy Life.

 

Copenhagenize Design Co. is excited to have contributed to a new exhibit at the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montréal on how an emerging obsession with happiness in connection to socioeconomic wellbeing is influencing the design of the spaces we inhabit. Our Happy Life, running from May 8 - October 13, asks the questions, “How do we measure the quality of our lives?” and “What is the data behind happiness?” It explores how this new quest for societal happiness — dubbed, the Happiness Agenda — is influencing the design, planning, and perception of our cities.

It’s no secret that Denmark is routinely ranked as one of the happiest countries in the world. At Copenhagenize, we seek to promote one part of what we believe is the key to Denmark’s — and particularly, Copenhagen’s — world-renowned happiness and liveability: the bicycle. For years, the bicycle has brought societies economic, health, and environmental benefits, making life easier and more efficient and creating spaces for social interaction in the process.

Since 2009, Copenhagenize Design Co. has pioneered a series of Desire Lines Analyses, where we’ve observed and mapped bicycle users’ trajectories across intersections to understand how they experience a particular kind of infrastructure design. The goal of these studies is to legitimize the most efficient A-to-B route in a given context by assessing, designing, and imagining the built environment for bicycle users based on how they are using it — not how a traffic engineer would like them to use it. One of our largest studies, which took place at Søtorvet in Copenhagen (otherwise known as the busiest bicycle intersection in the world!), is showcased in the CCA’s exhibit. We’re looking forward to furthering the conversation on user-oriented design!